Olive oil. Olive oil is a good source of vitamin E, polyphenols, and mono unsaturated fatty acids, all which help reduce the risk of heart disease.

How to include it: Use in place of butter or margarine in pasta or rice dishes. Drizzle over vegetables, use as a dressing, or when sautéing.

Whole grains. A good source of both soluble and insoluble fiber, whole grains also contain several B vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients. They have been shown to lower cholesterol and protect against heart disease and diabetes.

How to include them: Try having a bowl of oatmeal for breakfast. Substitute bulgur, quinoa, wheat berries, or brown rice for your usual baked potato. When buying breads at the supermarket, look to see that the first ingredient is “100% whole wheat flour.”

Yogurt. A good source of calcium and protein, yogurt also contains live cultures called probiotics. These “good bacteria” can protect the body from other, more harmful bacteria.

How to include it: Try eating more yogurt, but watch out for fruited or flavored yogurts, which contain a lot of added sugar. Buy plain yogurt and add your own fruit. Look for yogurts that have “live active cultures” such as Lactobacillus; L. acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, and S. thermophilus. You can use yogurt in place of mayonnaise or sour cream in dips or sauces.

Cruciferous vegetables. These include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collard greens, kale, kohlrabi, mustard greens, radishes, and turnips. They are an excellent source of fiber, vitamins, and phytochemicals including indoles, thiocyanates, and nitriles, which may prevent against some types of cancer.

How to include them: Steam or stir-fry, adding healthy oils and herbs and seasonings for flavor. Try adding a frozen cruciferous vegetable medley to soups, casseroles, and pasta dishes.

Legumes. This broad category includes kidney, black, red, and garbanzo beans, as well as soybeans and peas. Legumes are an excellent source of fiber, folate, and plant-based protein. Studies show they can help reduce the risk of heart disease.

How to include them: Add to salads, soups, and casseroles. Make a chili or a bean- b sed spread such as hummus.

Tomatoes. These are high in vitamin C and lycopene, which has been shown to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

How to include them: Try tomatoes in a salad or as a tomato sauce over your pasta. You can also put them in stews, soups, or chili. Lycopene becomes more available for your body to use when tomatoes are prepared and heated in a healthy fat such as olive oil.

Fresh Berry Caprese Salad

• 1/2 Cup balsamic vinegar

• 2 Cup fresh strawberries sliced

• 1 Cup fresh blueberries

• 1/2 Cup fresh basil chopped

• 1 Cup fres mozzarella cubed

• 1/4 Cup sliced almonds

• 1 Tbsp olive oil

• 6 Cup Spring Mix Salad

Instructions

1. Pour balsamic vinegar into a small saucepan. Bring to a gentle boil over low heat; cook 15 minutes or until reduced to a thick glaze. Allow to cool.

2. Place strawberries, blueberries, mozzarella, almonds and basil on top of spring mix salad. Drizzle with olive oil and balsamic glaze.

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