Sorghum Checkoff to host over 65 International Buyers

DALLAS, Texas – The United Sorghum Checkoff Program, in coordination with the U.S. Grains Council, Kansas Grain Sorghum Commission and Texas Grain Sorghum Producers Board, is hosting international grain buyers from eight countries who are currently purchasing or are interested in U.S. grain sorghum. The Export Sorghum event is a one-day, educational conference in Dallas,Texas, where buyers will learn more about sorghum markets, trade opportunities, contract negotiation, logistics and U.S. sorghum production.

“The Sorghum Checkoff is pleased to provide this one-of-a-kind event as exports serve as the largest market for U.S. sorghum,” said Florentino Lopez, Sorghum Checkoff executive director. “Export Sorghum serves as our opportunity to share the value of U.S. sorghum in new ways with potential buyers and continue fostering existing relationships.”

Following the conference, several teams will tour parts of the U.S. to experience sorghum production and the value chain firsthand while developing relationships with U.S. sorghum farmers and suppliers.

“Bringing members of each part of the sorghum value chain together is key to our mission of developing markets, enabling trade and improving lives,” said U.S. Grains Council President and CEO Ryan LeGrand. “The Council is pleased to be working with the United Sorghum Checkoff Program to develop relationships that promise to improve the flow of sorghum globally for U.S farmers.”

Export Sorghum is centered around creating networking opportunities while providing buyers with information to help them make sorghum the smart choice for their feed grain solutions.

“We are proud to be a sponsor for Export Sorghum as it is essential for our farmers to have access to markets,” said Jesse McCurry, Kansas Sorghum executive director. “We appreciate all of our buyers from around the world and the increasing opportunities we have to help customers understand the exciting possibilities of sorghum.”

The Sorghum Checkoff is dedicated to building strong relationships between buyers and sellers that drive U.S. sorghum sales around the world. Sorghum has proven to be a reliable ingredient across several industries including swine, poultry, beef, dairy and human food, which fulfills the Sorghum Checkoff’s mission to reveal the potential and versatility of sorghum through increased shared value between farmers and end-users worldwide.

“Export Sorghum is extremely beneficial for both our growers and the international buyers,” said Wayne Cleveland, Texas Sorghum executive director. “We want this to be an educational process, so across the gamut, we’ve provided those opportunities through the conference featuring sorghum experts and tours in Texas.”

To learn more about Export Sorghum, visit SorghumCheckoff.com/export-sorghum.

Sorghum notes from National Sorghum Producers

U.S. and Japan Reach a Trade Agreement

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lightizer and Japan Economy Minister Toshimitsu Motegi reached an agreement in principle on a trade deal in Washington, D.C., on Friday. The deal lowers Japanese tariffs on U.S. agricultural commodities. President Trump addressed the issue in a press conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Ab during his visit to the ongoing G7 summit in France. He noted the deal involves agriculture and they hope to complete the deal in September during the assembly of the United Nations. Japan is currently the third-largest market for U.S. agriculture products and is the second largest importer of U.S. sorghum. National Sorghum Producers is pleased to see an agreement between the two countries and looks forward to seeing the final details.

USDA Announces Details of Support Package for Farmers

Last Friday, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced the U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of the Chief Economist has published a detailed accounting of how estimated damage from trade disruptions was calculated for its support package for farmers, including estimates for the 2019 Market Facilitation Program. USDA’s Office of the Chief Economist developed an estimate of gross trade damages for commodities with assessed retaliatory tariffs by China, India, the European Union and Turkey to set commodity payment rates and purchase levels. USDA employed the same approach often used in adjudicating World Trade Organization trade dispute cases. Non-specialty crops commodity rates are as follows:

Soybeans $2.05 BU

Cotton $0.26 LB

Sorghum $1.69 BU

Corn $0.14 BU

Wheat $0.41 BU

Rice $0.63 CWT

Peanuts $0.01 LB

Lentils $3.99 CWT

Peas $0.85 CWT

Alfalfa Hay $2.81 TONS

Dried Beans $8.22 CWT

Chickpeas $1.48

Export Sorghum

Earlier this week, the United Sorghum Checkoff Program jointly hosted Export Sorghum alongside the U.S. Grains Council (USGC), Kansas Grain Sorghum Commission and Texas Grain Sorghum Producers Board. The group hosted international grain buyers from eight countries currently purchasing or are interested in U.S. grain sorghum. The event was a one-day conference held in Dallas, Texas. While there, buyers learned more about sorghum markets, trade opportunities, contract negotiation, logistics and U.S. sorghum production. After the conference multiple international teams toured different regions within the U.S. to see firsthand sorghum production. Export Sorghum is a one-of-a-kind event is solely focused on providing buyers with information to help them make the smart choice for their feed grain solutions.

China Trade Update

After last week’s narrative in trade talks with China, the negotiations between the two countries appear to be taking a positive step forward. Both U.S. and Chinese officials have indicated face-to-face discussions will likely resume in September. President Trump, who is currently attending the G7 summit in France, told reporters he was eager to restart talks and to reach an end to the trade war. This week’s dialogue continues to be upbeat but several key issues still remain unresolved. National Sorghum Producers continues to be engaged in the process and hopes the positive momentum will carry into next week’s discussions.

Crop Update

By August 26, eighty-six percent of the nation’s sorghum acreage had reached the heading stage, six percentage points behind last year and four points behind the five-year average. Forty-one percent of sorghum was at or beyond the coloring stage by August 26, 13 percentage points behind last year and 11 points behind average. By August 26, twenty-two percent of the nation’s sorghum was mature, eight percentage points behind last year and five points behind average. On August 26, sixty-six percent of the nation’s sorghum was rated in good to excellent.

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