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We have had somewhat successful first few days of being open. People have been nice about wearing masks. My glasses still fog up , but I just push ‘em down a little farther down my nose to alleviate that. On Sunday, I had a little mishap, Joe and I were moving some cross-ties into the garden, and I was standing on one. As I went to step down, my balance went and there I was, flat on my back – hat and glasses went flying. It took me a bit to regain my composure; but at least the 2.20 inches of rain made the ground soft. It wasn’t until Monday, I thought to be thankful that there wasn’t a FRESH cowpie around that I could have landed in (though Joe told me he brushed some dry ‘pie’ off of me).

Joel Rosenberg writes great political thrillers and “Without Warning” F ROS is one of his best. With a president who has drunk the cool-aid of friendship of terrorist, he will ignore J. B. Collins’ warning. As he prepares to deliver the State of the Union address, the president of the United States is convinced the Islamic State is on the run, about to be crushed by American forces once and for all. But New York Times foreign correspondent J. B. Collins tells the president he’s dead wrong. With the Middle East on fire, the Israeli prime minister dead, and Amman in ruins, Collins fears a catastrophic attack inside the American homeland is imminent. He argues that only an all-out manhunt to capture or kill Abu Kahlif—the leader of ISIS—can stop the attack and save American lives. But will the president listen and take decisive action before it’s too late?

Marina Keegan’s star was on the rise when she graduated magna cum laude from Yale in May 2012. She had a play that was to be produced at the New York Fringe Festival and a job waiting for her at The New Yorker. Tragically, five days after graduation, Marina died in a car crash. “The Opposite of Loneliness” (818 KEE) is a collection of Marina’s essays and stories that speaks of the universal struggle all of us face as we figure out what we aspire to be. I think that it will especially resonate with the Class of 2020 during this time of Covid-19 and how perhaps everyone can renew themselves to reassess their talents to impact the world.

My third book is “Music of the Alamo” (781.5 CHE) by William R. Chemerka and Allen J. Wiener. From a review left on Amazon.com, “It’s an astounding achievement upon a topic that has never been covered, to my knowledge. In truth it’s almost TOO MUCH information to absorb, and would probably be of interest only to an avid Alamo fan or perhaps students of American Folk/Roots music; because it is a jaw-dropping full-scope study of not only the history of these songs, but the ever-changing social attitudes, perspectives, and personal agendas that fueled both their creation as well as their popularity in their respective eras. As a result, this book is far more historically significant and valuable than I would ever have imagined, and the authors have done an exhaustively thorough job. “ Some of the books that are being reviewed, are donations and while are not new, new books, they are new to us. This one by Davis Bunn is copyrighted 2014, but in looking at it and reading the storyline, it sounded intriguing. “The Patmos Deception” (F BUN) has Nick Hennessy, a Texas journalist looking for his big break and he is in Europe, tracking the disappearance of priceless antiquities from historic sites. Carey Mathers, a forensic anthropologist with a focus on the isle of Patmos where the Apostle John received his vision of the Apocalypse.

Do you see where this is going? That’s all I’m gonna tell you, you will have to come check the book out to read the rest.

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